Stretching and Weight Training: A LYMBR stretch therapist and personal trainer’s perspective.

Strength Training continues to grow in popularity, more now than ever. It’s no wonder considering the many benefits – an increase in muscle size and strength, the ability to help maintain a lower body fat percentage, stress management, and, of course, the benefits we see in the mirror.

The last thing you want is for all that hard work at the gym to set you up for injury or pain down the road. If you make regular stretching a part of your fitness routine, you will greatly reduce that risk.

An avid weight trainer who focuses on upper bodywork came to us with lower back pain. A postural analysis was performed and it was identified that his shoulders were rounding forward. The anterior side (front) of his upper body became tight (overactive) due to the weight training, and the posterior chain (back) of the body became weaker (underactive).

The cause? Strength training shortens the muscles and creates microtears on the tissue during a workout. These microtears are caused by the tension placed on the muscle from using weights. Through this process, the length of the muscles is shortened, and over time, the more these fibers remain shortened, the more prone you became to injury and compromised posture.

The physiology of the body is very good at seeking equilibrium. The body will always seek a balance in which the body creates a stable environment. But in our client’s case, this new stable environment came at a cost. Rounded shoulders created an imbalance within the mid-line of this body, creating an improper posture. And thanks to gravity, the weight-bearing lumbar spine had to support more weight due to the slight protruding head that comes with rounded shoulders, resulting in lower back pain.

Stretching the muscles of the anterior portion of his upper body helped him regain better posture by lengthening the appropriate muscles. As the muscles lengthened, the rounding in his shoulders decreased. As his body found its new, more efficient equilibrium and his posture improved, the pain resolved as the pressure was taken off his lower back (primarily his Latissimus Dorsi).

We are often asked, “what is the best set of stretches for weight lifting?” The answer – there is no specific stretch regimen. It all depends on each person’s body blueprint, and what they need according to their overall assessment. Whether you’re a beginner, moderate or frequent gym member, every stretch protocol is different.

Our sessions helped him to better understand how his body works and how to be conscious of when his body is in need of a stretch. His workouts are more effective, his movements are more efficient, his training can progress, and he will reduce the risk of further pain or injury.

Written by Noah Moore. Noah is a Stretch Therapist in our Darien Studio.
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Stretching For Golf

The golf swing is one of the most complex and beautiful motions in all sports. It utilizes the entire kinetic chain to transfer forces from your feet through your hips and back, to your shoulders and hands. The spiraling golf swing is truly a full body movement. We have clients come in sharing that golf is doing a number on their body – making them feel older than they are, and by the end of the season they are really hurting. Assisted stretching can make a big difference, as long as each client is evaluated for their individual needs.

If we look at common ailments that sideline golfers we see overuse and low back issues topping the list. Overuse injuries are just what the name indicates, and often easily preventable. Overusing an area, simply put, is performing motion, stopping, and performing the action again and again. The stopping and resuming occurs between shots, between holes, between rounds and between days. Every time a muscle gets warm, which occurs during frequent use, it eventually cools down. During the cool down phase the muscle contracts. Without any activity to restore length muscles will get incrementally shorter. Some players may feel discomfort after their first round while other players can go weeks even months before feeling something. Including stretching to keep you muscles long and your nerves relaxed at any time is helpful to prevent injuries.

Every part of the body is involved in a golf swing, yet not everyone swings the clubs or hits the ball the same. Because everyone is different there are specific stretches for each person. The differences in swings cause the body to brace and store impact forces differently for each of us.

Therefore, the entire body should be considered and considered on an individual basis. We see two very common areas that clients see relief from; stretching the hip flexors and adductors which greatly increase the golfer’s drive, and stretching the low back which relieves tightness and pain. These finer details are what a stretch therapist highlights for you to keep you out on the course, competing in tournaments, and getting the most out of your season.

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Is IT Band Syndrome Limiting Your Miles?

Iliotibial- Band syndrome, is otherwise known as IT Band Syndrome and ITBS. Make no mistake ITBS is not BS! This will stop a runner in their tracks or hinder you from using the stairs. ITBS is one the most common overuse injuries afflicting up to 12 percent of runners, both beginners and elite. ITBS is most commonly observed as throbbing pain on the side of your knee and can be debilitating if not treated properly

IT-band Syndrome can originate in many ways. One area that can influence this issue has to do higher up the leg with a muscle called the Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL). The TFL becomes the IT band and goes down the leg to connect on the outside of the knee and can rub against the bone. When the TFL muscle gets too tight it can cause compensations, increasing the tension area in the knee leading to inflammation and pain. The pain can be so severe it and can slow down even the most seasoned runners.

Help keep IT Band syndrome off your radar by making the right stretches part of your routine! It is important to stretch the individual muscles around  the lower body including the glutes, hamstrings, and the abductors – even low back muscles. Keeping these often-used areas flexible will help prevent ITBS and keep you running pain free!

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Sitting Is Getting A Bum Wrap

Sitting is the new bad word when in reality it’s more than just sitting, the problem is also how long we sit and how unprepared our body is. We tend to stay seated for long periods of time which can change muscular tension and cause that tension to accumulate in certain areas. When these unprepared areas are held in one positions for long, continuous hours such as being seated at your desk, your body starts to adapt toward that position causing one to experience reduced range of motion, stiffness and even pain.

When we sit, the back side of the hip gets longer while the front side gets shorter, just as your elbow has one side that shortens and once side that lengthens when it bends. The muscle that gets talked about most often with the topic of sitting is the hamstring, more specifically the hamstring’s upper attachment to the pelvic bone. But it is also important to note that when you sit, generally that upper hamstring / pelvis attachment is actually longer while the hamstring’s other attachment is shorter. If you’re wondering where the other attachment is located, just put you hand behind your bent knee and you’ll be in the right area. The real culprit to hamstring “tightness” due to sitting is the lower hamstring portion, the portion that connects to the back of your knee. The images below show a common protocol to address this issue. Think about this – when standing, a straight leg extends behind the body about 15 degrees, while a knee bends 150-170 degrees. That’s a big range of motion difference and potential.

In short, the area that moves the most, in this case the area where the lower hamstring attaches to the knee, has the most to lose or the most to gain! If you leave out this important connection in your body, you will have a hard time finding true relief from those hours of sitting.

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